Important Immigration Updates

Page last updated October 19, 2017,  2:30 p.m. EST.

As of October 17, 2017, a U.S. court issued a temporary restraining order blocking implementation of most of the travel restrictions imposed by the September 24, 2017 Presidential proclamation.  Only the restrictions for North Korea and Venezuela remain in place. It is expected that this order will be appealed soon.

The current presidential administration is implementing many new policies.  The NAFSA Adviser’s Manual News feed is a reliable source of information about immigration-related changes that may impact you.

Contact us when you have questions about how a new development may impact your situation. We are here to support you.


Travel restrictions for individuals from some countries

Citizens of nine countries (Chad, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela, and Yemen) will face new restrictions on entry to the United States under a proclamation signed by the U.S. president on September 24, 2017. It replaces the "travel ban" that was set to expire on the same day.

Read the full proclamation

One key change to this proclamation is that it does not expire like the executive order it replaces. These restrictions will remain in place until the U.S. government determines each individual country meets its criteria.

When does the proclamation take effect?

The new travel restrictions are effective immediately for individuals who were subject to the two earlier executive orders and lack a credible claim of a relationship with a person or entity in the United States. For individuals newly subject to the proclamation, the effective date is October 18, 2017.
 If you are an international student or scholar currently at IUPUI, you are not in danger of being removed from the country or having your visa revoked as a result of this proclamation.

Who is impacted?

The proclamation only applies to foreign nationals who:

  • Are outside the United States on the effective date
  • Do not have a valid visa on the effective date
  • Do not qualify for a visa or valid travel document under the proclamation

Who is not impacted?

The proclamation does not apply to:

  • All existing immigrant and nonimmigrants currently holding a visa (i.e., individuals will not have their visas revoked)
  • Any lawful permanent resident of the United States
  • Any foreign national admitted or paroled into the United States on or after the effective date
  • Any foreign national who has an advance parole (travel) document that is valid on or after the effective date and that permits travel and to seek entry to the United States
  • Any dual national of a country when the individual is traveling on a passport issued by a non-designated country
  • Any foreign national granted asylum by the United States
  • Any refugee that has been admitted to the United States

Country-Specific Information

The proclamation treats each country differently. Below is a review of what the impact is for each individual country.

  • Chad

    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of visas for immigrant visas (permanent residency/green card)
    • Suspension of nonimmigrant visas for business, tourist, and business/tourist visas (B-1, B-2, and B-1/B-2)
  • Iran

    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of visas for immigrant visas (permanent residency/green card)
    • Suspension of the issuance of several nonimmigrant visas, H-1B, O-1, B-1, and B-2
    • Citizens will still be able to apply for student and cultural exchange visas (F-1 and J-1) if they undergo enhanced screening and vetting requirements (we do not know what these new requirements are at this time)
  • Iraq

    • Citizens will be subject to additional scrutiny to determine if they pose risks to the national security or public safety of the United States (we do not know what the additional scrutiny will entail at this time).
  • Libya

    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of visas for immigrant visas (permanent residency/green card)
    • Suspension of nonimmigrant visas for business, tourist, and business/tourist (B-1, B-2, B-1/B-2)
  • North Korea

    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of visas for immigrant visas (permanent residency/green card)
    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of nonimmigrant visas (H-1B, F-1, O-1, J-1, B-1, and B-2)
  • Somalia

    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of visas for immigrant visas (permanent residency/green card)
    • Citizens seeking nonimmigrant visas will be required to undergo additional scrutiny to determine if they are connected to terrorists organization or otherwise pose a threat to the national security or public safety of the United States (we do not know what the additional scrutiny will entail at this time)
  • Syria

    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of visas for immigrant visas (permanent residency/green card)
    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of nonimmigrant visas (H-1B, F-1, O-1, J-1, B-1, and B-2)
  • Venezuela

    • Suspension of entry and the issuance of nonimmigrant visas on business, tourist, and business/tourist visas (B-1, B-2, B-1/B-2) for certain government officials and their immediate families
  • Yemen

    • Suspension on entry, issuance of entries, and issuance of visas for immigrant visas (permanent residency/green card)
    • Suspension of nonimmigrant visas for business, tourist, and business/tourist (B-1, B-2, B-1/B-2)


Implications for students/scholars who wish to come to IUPUI

We will continue to process applications for admission and issue the necessary immigration documents (Forms I-20 or DS-2019 in most cases), regardless of citizenship. We will provide individual counseling to help those from the impacted countries.

Invitations to visiting scholars and offers of employment to foreign nationals from the impacted countries will likely require additional advising and processing time prior to employment eligibility.

Waivers

The proclamation permits, but does not guarantee, case-by-case waivers for citizens of the affected countries who meet certain criteria. That includes, but is not limited to:

  • Having previously worked, studied or engaged in a long-term activity in the U.S. for a continuous period of time and the denial of entry would impair that activity
  • Having previously established "significant contacts" with the United States for work, study or other lawful activity but is outside the United States on the effective date of the Proclamation
  • Having "significant business or professional obligations" in the United States and the denial of entry would cause the foreign national undue hardship
  • Seeking to visit or reside with a close family member (e.g., spouse, child, or parent) who is a U.S. citizen, lawful permanent resident, or alien lawfully admitted on a valid nonimmigrant visa, and the denial of entry would cause undue hardship
  • Having Canadian permanent residency and applying for a U.S. visa from a location within Canada

Additional Information for All Students and Scholars

  • Your Rights in the U.S.

    As an international student or scholar, you have specific rights in the U.S.

    Know your rights » 

  • Hiring an attorney

    If you'd like to speak with an experienced immigration attorney on how the order may apply to your specific situation, contact us. We'll work with the IU Office of General Counsel to refer you to an attorney.